First impressions

The journey to Israel/Palestine had its challenging moments, but we made it! I’m certain everyone in the group was feeling exhausted by the time we arrived at the Tel Aviv airport. On the bus ride to Jerusalem, the terrain was rocky and hilly with small shrubs and trees. Our tour guide Said pointed out that many of the trees are not indigenous to the region, except for Oak trees, and possibly Cyprus. The many pine trees, and palm trees had been planted to hide destroyed Palestinian villages.
The highway we traveled on was built to allow drivers to avoid areas where Palestinian people live. There are other roadways through tunnels that avoid the bypass. Some of the roadways are cutoff, and dead end at the bypass. We learned that Palestinians are only able to use certain sections of the bypass for limited number hours. However, they must go through a checkpoint and cars are detained for several hours, making using the bypass impractical. We also spotted a soldier on a ridge, and a surveillance balloon watching the highway. Said pointed out the villages with black water towers on the roof. He explained to us that the Israel government will cut off the water supply without notice, and the black water towers serve as a backup.

It seemed to me that the shadow of Israel was even more evident within the wall of the old city of Jerusalem. On the surface the old city is vibrant, and beautiful. There are vendors selling spices, clothing, and freshly pressed juice. When looking viewing it through the lens of a tourist it is an amazing place to visit. However, if you take a moment to scratch beneath the surface it quickly becomes clear that people living in the city are not truly in harmony. There are cameras on every street, and barbed wires and fences separating different sections. Israeli parents hire security guards to escort their children. More and more settler only homes are appearing. We passed a Mosque, which will soon have a settler home next to it. Street names have been changed from their original Palestinian name.
To me the old city was like a trip through Disneyland. Many areas where sanitized of their history, and visitors only saw what people in power wanted them to see.


-Stephanie Langer